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  2. Diabetes - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabetes

    National guidelines for England and Wales by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommend against the use of aspirin in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who do not have confirmed cardiovascular disease. Surgery. Weight loss surgery in those with obesity and type 2 diabetes is often an effective measure.

  3. Universal health care - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_health_care

    Universal health care in most countries has been achieved by a mixed model of funding. General taxation revenue is the primary source of funding, but in many countries it is supplemented by specific charge (which may be charged to the individual or an employer) or with the option of private payments (by direct or optional insurance) for services beyond those covered by the public system.

  4. UnitedHealth Group - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UnitedHealth_Group

    The close relations between UnitedHealth, Audax Health and Rally Health follows a close personal relationship between Grant Vrestandig (Audax and Rally) and UnitedHealth's President and CFO at the time, David Wichmann. In June 2019, UnitedHealth's Optum division acquired Davita Medical Group from DaVita Inc. for $4.3 billion.

  5. List of countries with universal health care - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_with...

    Botswana established a free healthcare system that operates a system of public medical centers, with 98% of health facilities in the country run by the government. [citation needed] All citizens are entitled to be treated in taxpayer funded facilities, though a nominal fee of ~70 BWP (~US$6.60) is typically charged for public health services except for sexual reproductive health services and ...

  6. Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible? - Healthline

    www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes-reversible

    Type 2 diabetes is a long-term, chronic medical condition. It develops mostly in adults but is becoming more common in children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

  7. Social services - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_services

    The US does not provide a universal health care program, but introduced the Affordable Care Act in 2010. For more, see Healthcare in the United States . Within the area of child welfare, social services aim to provide help to children and their families, whilst providing mechanisms to ensure they are able to live safe, stable lives with a ...

  8. Hyperglycemia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperglycemia

    Hyperglycemia is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma.This is generally a blood sugar level higher than 11.1 mmol/L (200 mg/dL), but symptoms may not start to become noticeable until even higher values such as 13.9–16.7 mmol/L (~250–300 mg/dL).

  9. CalPERS - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CalPERS

    Health benefits. In 1961, the Meyer-Geddes Hospital and Medical Health Care Act was passed, which led to SERS' offering health insurance for state employees beginning in 1962. After the Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) Act of 1973, PERS began to deal with HMOs "to create more unified and standardized health care benefit rates".